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Workshops
Workshop
Vidya Narayanan
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Yuhao Chen
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Chunyuan Li
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Marcos V. Conde
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Jieyu Zhang
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Felix Juefei Xu · Tingbo Hou
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Adriana Romero-Soriano
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Adam Kortylewski
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Li Chen
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Hisham Cholakkal · Teng Xi
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Gedas Bertasius
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Jun Ma
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Alexei Skurikhin
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Tat-Jun Chin
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David Fouhey
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James Tompkin · Deqing Sun
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Anyi Rao
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Andrey Ignatov
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Tse-Wei Chen
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Xiaoming Li
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This workshop focuses on Mobile Intelligent and Photography Imaging (MIPI). It is closely connected to the impressive advancements of computational photography and imaging on mobile platforms (e.g., phones, AR/VR devices, and automatic cars), especially with the explosive growth of new image sensors and camera systems. Currently, the demand for developing and perfecting advanced image sensors and camera systems is rising rapidly. Meanwhile, new sensors and camera systems present interesting and novel research problems to the community. Moreover, the limited computing resources on mobile devices further compound the challenges, as it requires developing lightweight and efficient algorithms. However, the lack of high-quality data for research and the rare opportunity for an in-depth exchange of views from industry and academia constrain the development of mobile intelligent photography and imaging.

With the consecutive success of the 1st MIPI Workshop@ECCV 2022 and the 2nd MIPI Workshop@CVPR 2023, we will continue to arrange new sensors and imaging systems-related competition with industry-level data, and invite keynote speakers from both industry and academia to fuse the synergy. In this MIPI workshop, the competition will include three tracks: few-shot raw denoising, event-based sensor, and Nighttime Flare Removal. MIPI wishes to gather researchers and engineers together, encompassing the challenging …

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Kaavya Rekanar
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Rodolfo Valiente Romero · Nils Murrugarra Llerena · Laura Montoya
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Sachini A Herath
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Anand Bhattad
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Julieta Martinez
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Rakesh Ranjan
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Fangneng Zhan
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Xiaowei Zhou
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Habib Slim
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Matteo Poggi
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Patrick Wenzel
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Guy Tevet
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Qianli Ma
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Davide Moltisanti
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Anthony G Francis
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Antonino Furnari
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Latha Pemula
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Lei Zhang
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Saeed Vahidian
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In the past decade, deep learning has been mainly advanced by training increasingly large models on increasingly large datasets which comes with the price of massive computation and expensive devices for their training.
As a result, research on designing state-of-the-art models gradually gets monopolized by large companies, while research groups with limited resources such as universities and small companies are unable to compete.
Reducing the training dataset size while preserving model training effects is significant for reducing the training cost, enabling green AI, and encouraging the university research groups to engage in the latest research.
This workshop focuses on the emerging research field of dataset distillation which aims to compress a large training dataset into a tiny informative one (e.g. 1\% of the size of the original data) while maintaining the performance of models trained on this dataset. Besides general-purpose efficient model training, dataset distillation can also greatly facilitate downstream tasks such as neural architecture/hyperparameter search by speeding up model evaluation, continual learning by producing compact memory, federated learning by reducing data transmission, and privacy-preserving learning by removing data privacy. Dataset distillation is also closely related to research topics including core-set selection, prototype generation, active learning, few-shot learning, generative models, …

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Eduard Trulls
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Matthew A Gwilliam
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Congyue Deng
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Ahmet Iscen
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Amir Bar · Kaiyang Zhou
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Anoop Cherian
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Paolo Rota
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Andrew Owens
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Zheng Tang
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Eshed Ohn-Bar
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Žan Gojčič · Maximilian Igl
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Vincent Casser
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Candice Schumann
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Bir Bhanu
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Jun Wan
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Hany Farid
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Despoina Paschalidou
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Nico Lang
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It may be tempting to think that image classification is a solved problem. However, one only needs to look at the poor performance of existing techniques in domains with limited training data and highly similar categories to see that this is not the case. In particular, fine-grained categorization, e.g., the precise differentiation between similar plant or animal species, disease of the retina, architectural styles, etc., is an extremely challenging problem, pushing the limits of both human and machine performance. In these domains, expert knowledge is typically required, and the question that must be addressed is how we can develop artificial systems that can efficiently discriminate between large numbers of highly similar visual concepts.

The 11th Workshop on Fine-Grained Visual Categorization (FGVC11) will explore topics related to supervised learning, self-supervised learning, semi-supervised learning, vision and language, matching, localization, domain adaptation, transfer learning, few-shot learning, machine teaching, multimodal learning (e.g., audio and video), 3D-vision, crowd-sourcing, image captioning and generation, out-of-distribution detection, anomaly detection, open-set recognition, human-in-the-loop learning, and taxonomic prediction, all through the lens of fine-grained understanding. Hence, the relevant topics are neither restricted to vision nor categorization.

Our workshop is structured around five main components:

(i) invited talks from world-renowned computer …

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Changan Chen
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Auke Wiggers · Amirhossein Habibian
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Stephen McGough
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Efstratios Gavves
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